ACL Tear Image gellary
Health

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries Physiotherapy Treatments

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

One of the very common knee injuries is an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear or sprain.

Athletes who take part in high demand sports like basketball, soccer and football are more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL).

If you have suffered your anterior cruciate ligament, you may have require surgery to regain full function of your knee. This will depends on several factors, like the severity of your injury and your action level.

Anatomy

There are three major bones meet to form your knee joint: one is femur (thighbone) upper leg bone, second is tibia (shinbone), and third patella (kneecap). Your Patella or kneecap sit down in front of the joint to provide in some protection.Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

The Bones are attached to another bones by ligaments. There are four most important ligaments in your knee. They doing hold the bones together and keep your knee established.

Collateral Ligaments

Collateral Ligaments is originate on the sides of your knee. The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is on the inside and others lateral collateral ligament (LCL) is on the outside. They control your knee sideways motion and brace it against unusual movement.

Cruciate Ligaments

Cruciate Ligaments are originate inside your knee joint. Medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) cross each other to form an “X” with the anterior cruciate ligament in front and the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in back. The cruciate ligaments act control your knee the back and forth motion.

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) runs crossways in the middle of the knee. ACL prevents the tibia from sliding out in front of the femur (upper leg bone), along with provides to the rotational stability knee.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries Grade :

Injured ligaments are measured “sprains” and are graded on a severity scale.Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries Grade

One is Grade one Sprains. The ligament is mildly damaged in a Sprain. Grade one Sprains has been slightly stretched, but is still able to help keep the knee joint stable.

Grade two Sprains. A stretches the ligament to the point where it becomes loose. This is sometime referred to as a partial tear of the ligament Grade two Sprains.

Grade three Sprains. Sprain is most commonly mentioned to as a complete tear of the ligament. The ligament has been divided into two pieces, and the knee joint is unstable Grade three Sprains.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries Causes and Symptoms:

For know more visit wikipedia.

 

About the author

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.